Tag Archives: NAS

The King is Dead. Long Live the King!

With a title like Death by 1,000 cuts: Mainstream storage array supplies are bleeding, I couldn’t help but read Chris Mellor’s article on the decline of traditional storage arrays.  It starts off just as strong with:

Great beasts can be killed by a 1,000 cuts, bleeding to death from the myriad slashes in their bodies – none of which, on their own, is a killer. And this, it seems, is the way things are going for big-brand storage arrays, as upstarts slice away at the market…

And his reasons as to why are spot on from what we have seen in our target customer segment for HC3.

the classic storage array was under attack because it was becoming too limiting, complex and expensive for more and more use-cases.

Looking at our own use-case for HC3, storage array adoption for our target segment (the SMB) rose with the demand for virtualization, providing shared storage for things like live migration and failover of VMs.  It was a necessary evil to know that critical workloads weren’t going to go down for days or even weeks in the event of a hardware failure. Continue reading

Don’t Believe Them – Scale Computing’s HC3 is not a cheaper solution that is less capable

I have heard something out in the market a few times lately, something that really bothers me. What I’ve heard is a new way for our competitors to try to marginalize us with our customers. It goes something like this:  “Scale is a great solution if you don’t have much budget for virtualization. But if you do have the budget, you should go for the ‘premium solution’ from the name brand vendors.” I.e. traditional servers + SAN + storage switching + virtualization software suite. We usually hear HP, Dell, IBM or even Cisco servers along with EMC, Netapp, or other storage along with VMware. Continue reading

VMware is Dead

We recently presented at an analyst-centric conference in which the lead-in to our presentation was “VMware is dead. Storage is dead.”  We certainly drew some inquisitive looks from the audience. But as we explained HC3 and the underlying technology, the puzzled looks turned into nods of agreement.

Some of the latest buzz has centered around the “software-defined datacenter” which is an extension of software-defined networking that has made its way into software-defined storage and software-defined servers – all three of which culminate in the software-defined datacenter.  In the end, it’s all about the promise of making infrastructure easy to deploy and manage. Continue reading

VIDEO: The Twelve Networking Truths – RFC 1925 Truth No. 5

RFC 1925 Truth No. 5: “It is always possible to aglutenate multiple separate problems into a single complex interdependent solution. In most cases this is a bad idea.”

So to paraphrase truth No. 5, complexity is a bad thing.  However, this is exactly how virtualized infrastructures are built today. Continue reading