Tag Archives: IBM

Don’t Believe Them – Scale Computing’s HC3 is not a cheaper solution that is less capable

I have heard something out in the market a few times lately, something that really bothers me. What I’ve heard is a new way for our competitors to try to marginalize us with our customers. It goes something like this:  “Scale is a great solution if you don’t have much budget for virtualization. But if you do have the budget, you should go for the ‘premium solution’ from the name brand vendors.” I.e. traditional servers + SAN + storage switching + virtualization software suite. We usually hear HP, Dell, IBM or even Cisco servers along with EMC, Netapp, or other storage along with VMware. Continue reading

What is Hyperconvergence?

Hyperconvergence is a term that sort of crept up on the market and has since stuck. It’s used to describe products like our HC3.  But what does hyperconvergence actually mean?

Active blogger and technologist Stevie Chambers wrote a well-thought article in which he defined hyperconvergence as an extension of the overall convergence trend, collapsing the datacenter into an appliance form factor. This is certainly true of the solutions that are available today. However, I believe he missed a key point (perhaps intentionally, as Stevie was in the CTO group at VCE when that blog was written). Continue reading

Is VMware Headed for the Le Brea Tar Pits?

I recently received an inbound call from a value-added reseller looking for virtualization solutions for his SMB customers. The conversation began as they normally do: he heard something bout Scale Computing and our technology, but really didn’t understand what we were doing. He said—and I quote:

“It looks like you’ve virtualized all the core functions in the rack: servers, storage, networking. But that’s not really possible. So what is it you do?”

With a smile on my face that he couldn’t see, I simply replied “yes.” Continue reading

Big Changes Start in the Midmarket

In my last post, I wrote about why we focus on midsize companies. I reminisced the Saturday mornings in the server room of the construction company where my dad worked, where I’d play with the data-entry station while my dad worked on whatever was the IT problem du jour.

If you missed that post, you might check out this video of our CTO, Jason Collier, and me talking about our midmarket focus, where we share a couple of stories about the roots of our market focus.

An interesting thing about the midmarket is this:  It is the most often overlooked segment of the market by large vendors and startups alike.  It’s a difficult market to reach, with layers of consultants and resellers, tight budgets, and small IT staffs.  But, there are hundreds of thousands of companies in the US alone that fit this profile. Continue reading

Virtualization 101: The Phantom Multics

 

I don’t know about you but I have seen enough virtualization 101 articles, blogs, and explanations to make my eyes bleed. And, they all say the same thing.  They talk about which company popularized virtualization, discuss server consolidation, maybe mention total cost of ownership (TCO), or return on investment(ROI).  If the author is really savvy, he/she may mention IBM and the fact that what they are really discussing is server virtualization and explain the different types.  Yet, rarely do they give you a glimpse into earlier versions of virtualization.  You do not get to hear the inside scoop of how virtualization came to be and why it is extremely important for IT.  I want to give you a piece of that prequel. Continue reading

KVM or VMware: Why KVM is Right for the Times (Part 2 of 2)

The Holy Grail of IT, especially SMB IT, is to have a datacenter that’s simple and easy to use. Preferably, as easy as an iPhone or Android phone with enterprise software that is as easy to access and run as Angry Birds is from an app store.

Thanks to KVM and Scale Computing, that vision is possible. And, well on its way.

This blog continues where Part 1 left off and describes how KVM is implemented within Scale’s HC3.

Strategic for the Customer and Scale Computing

Both commercial developers and consumers need to worry about the EMC trap. The company owns VMware and is well-known in the industry for its aggressive business moves. VMware storage partners who are developing converged solutions based on VMware are tying their company’s future to their competition. It’s quite probable that EMC could create a hyperconverged version of VMware that only runs on EMC storage gear. All other vendors could be locked out, severely limiting choices for vendors, resellers and especially users. Continue reading

Limit the Buzzwords, Please!

Virtualization, cloud, SaaS, IaaS, software-defined datacenter, follow-the-sun computing, big data, VDI, etc.  As a 15+ years industry veteran of startups and small and medium-sized companies (I know, I know, I’m a young pup to some of you), I must admit that I have used these buzzwords.

As a Sales and Systems Engineer and Manager, and Director of Sales/Systems Engineers, I know these topics have defined conversations at customers in the Fortune 1000 – and beyond. Companies such as Salesforce, Facebook, Sony, and Texas Instruments have leveraged myself or my peers at previous companies that I have worked for (such as VMware) to explain how they will affect internal processes. These concepts are transforming IT as we know it and their discussions dramatically impact a mature business.

Continue reading

Why does Scale focus on midsize companies?

I can remember spending time as a kid with my dad at work.  He was the “Manager of Information Systems” (what we now call an IT guy)  for an industrial construction company.  The server room was loud, had a raised floor, a towering multi-head line printer that shook the room, and a massive IBM mainframe. There were dumb terminals built into the tabletops that ran the perimeter of the room and a punch card machine in a small separate room that overlooked the whole thing.

And there were people. Quite a few people doing data entry and managing the system and changing the reel-to-reel tapes.  It definitely had the look of a pretty significant operation.

Over time, I saw that mainframe supplemented and then replaced by PC servers.  The data entry people were replaced with software and automation. Before you knew it, remote construction sites needed modem-based access into the systems at the headquarters.

But this was a midsize company, and then, budgets were limited – just as they are now. Remote access was provided via programs like PC Anywhere coupled with consumer-type BBS software. Integration and migration of data between systems was done with homespun scripts backed by hours of me watching dad on the couch, debugging source code printed on green-lined paper. Continue reading