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“Mikey likes it!” – Windows 2008 R2 VM in less than a minute

As a child of the 80’s, it’s hard not to smile thinking back on the classic Life cereal commercial “Mikey likes it!”  For those of you who don’t remember, the commercial starts with two boys leery of trying a new cereal that is supposedly good for them.  Instead, they decide to use Mikey –  a boy I assume to be their little brother – as a guinea pig.  “He won’t eat it. He hates everything.”  The boys stare in disbelief watching Mikey take a bite. And, as you can guess from the title of the commercial, Mikey likes it! I was reminded of this last week while on the road at a reseller event and thought others might enjoy sharing in the nostalgia. Continue reading

Are You Ready to TappIN?

I’m at RSA, the premiere security show of the year. It’s held at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. Air is cold, streets are crowed with lanyard-wearing men and women shuffling back and forth between hotels, meetings, conferences and the trade show floor. It’s awesome.

I’d estimate that 75 percent of the people walking by aren’t looking at the road ahead, but the miles of email or messaging below on their mobile device that’s glued to their hands. Obviously, I too, am looking at such a device. Call me a hypocrite. Continue reading

VMware is Dead

We recently presented at an analyst-centric conference in which the lead-in to our presentation was “VMware is dead. Storage is dead.”  We certainly drew some inquisitive looks from the audience. But as we explained HC3 and the underlying technology, the puzzled looks turned into nods of agreement.

Some of the latest buzz has centered around the “software-defined datacenter” which is an extension of software-defined networking that has made its way into software-defined storage and software-defined servers – all three of which culminate in the software-defined datacenter.  In the end, it’s all about the promise of making infrastructure easy to deploy and manage. Continue reading

StorageCraft Helps “Rap” Your Physical Machines onto HC3

Virtualization is a hot topic in the SMB sector and I’m glad that we’ve been able to partner with StorageCraft. The company provides a unique time-based tool to help move physical machines into the virtual world. Called the StorageCraft Shadow Protect IT Edition, the product comes on a USB key and siphons all necessary files from your physical servers and makes them ready for deployment onto the HC3 platform. Continue reading

The Spaghetti Incident

For those of you that don’t know, Scale Computing is an Indianapolis-based technology company focused on virtualization hyperconvergence. And, as good Midwestern boys and girls, we enjoy some Guns N’ Roses.  The music is often blasted in the IT pit. Our CTO, Jason Collier, is known to belt out Paradise City lyrics at merely the suggestion of the band. Our CEO, Jeff Ready, once led a company discussion praising the benefits of the band releasing Use Your Illusion, which compiled the best songs from both Use Your Illusion I and II.

Yet one GNR release that is never discussed is The Spaghetti Incident. Why? Actually, it is a number of reasons. At this time, the core of Guns N’ Roses was breaking apart. Steven Adler and Izzy Stradlin had left the band, with Slash and Duff following after this release. As their follow up to Use Your Illusion I and II releases, The Spaghetti Incident is a cover album and a compilation of songs that didn’t make the cut from the two Use Your Illusions.  It is a retread of a formula and a mishmash lacking key players and thought. Quite simply: it is their leftovers. Continue reading

HC3 Under the Hood: Creating a VM

In the last post of this series, we talked about how multiple independent HC3 nodes are joined together into a cluster that is managed like a single system with a single pool of storage and compute resources, as well as built-in redundancy for high availability.

For a quick review, the end-user view of this process is as simple as racking the nodes, connecting them to power and your network, giving them IP addresses, and assigning them to join a cluster.

You might expect after that there should be any number of steps required to configure individual disks into RAID arrays and spares. Then provision storage targets, sharing protocols and security, both physically and logically connect each shared storage resource to each compute resource with multiple redundant paths. Ultimately, configure a hypervisor to use that raw storage to create partitions and file systems to store individual data objects, such as virtual disks. Those would be the next steps with virtually ANY other system available.

Well, you don’t have to do any of that with HC3 because the storage layer is fully integrated with the compute hardware and virtualization software layers – all managed by the system.  Ah, management. So maybe now it’s time to install and configure a separate VM management server and management client software on your workstation to oversee all the virtualization hosts and software? Again, not with HC3 since the management layer is built-in and accessible simply by pointing your web browser to the cluster and logging in.

With HC3, you go right from configuring each node as a member of the HC3 system to pointing a web browser to HC3. And in a few clicks, you have created your first HC3 virtual machine.

This is definitely something that is best to see with your own eyes (or better yet, ask us for a demo and we will let YOU drive!). The HC3 system in this video already has a number of VMs running, but the process you will see here is exactly the same for the very first VM you create.

Creating a virtual machine is a simple process that is accomplished through the Scale Computing HC3 Manager web browser user interface. Selecting the ‘Create’ option from the ‘Virtualization’ tab allows the user to specify required and optional parameters for the virtual machine including:

• Number of virtual CPU cores

• RAM

• Number and size of virtual disks to create; and to

• Attach or upload a virtual DVD/CD ISO image for installing an operating system.

Creating the virtual machine not only persists those VM configuration parameters that will later tell the hypervisor how to create the virtual machine container when it is started, but it also physically creates files using the distributed storage pool that will contain the virtual hard disks to present to the VM once it is started. For maximum flexibility, we create those files inside a default storage pool container called VM to present a file/folder structure for organizing virtual machine files.  HC3 Virtual Machines are able to access their virtual hard disk files directly as if they are local disks, without the use of any SAN or NAS protocols, and can access those virtual disks from any node of the HC3 cluster – which is the key to capabilities like VM Live Migration and VM failover from node to node.

In the next post, we will dig into how HC3 virtual disks files are actually stored. As well as how you can optionally use the external storage protocol capabilities of HC3 to access and browse HC3 storage pools for VMs and ISO media image from remote machines.

 

Don’t Be Stupid When You Build Your Company!

In my last blog post, I talked about the differences between Objectives and Results and the mistakes companies (including salespeople) make in confusing the two. The point is that the Sale is not an objective, but a result of doing the right things – and doing enough of them. The same is true for companies and really needs to be looked at closely especially when building your tech company, whether you “write code” or “sell code”, i.e. develop technology or market/sell it.

Here is the thing that many tech companies get WRONG: you need to build the company to achieve the result you want. And to do that, you have to do it in a certain way. I call this the “Value Chain” because the steps are linked in a certain order and you can’t really skip steps or put them in the wrong order and still be successful (accidents of business or nature notwithstanding). Continue reading

What is Hyperconvergence?

Hyperconvergence is a term that sort of crept up on the market and has since stuck. It’s used to describe products like our HC3.  But what does hyperconvergence actually mean?

Active blogger and technologist Stevie Chambers wrote a well-thought article in which he defined hyperconvergence as an extension of the overall convergence trend, collapsing the datacenter into an appliance form factor. This is certainly true of the solutions that are available today. However, I believe he missed a key point (perhaps intentionally, as Stevie was in the CTO group at VCE when that blog was written). Continue reading